All small size dollars (1929+) are still in circulation. Previous series (1861+) are valid and exchangeable, but their collector’s price is much higher than face value.

             The only canceled note - 1900 $10,000 Gold Certificate - on the picture. These notes became available in 1935 when the Treasury Warehouse caught fire.  As the fire spread, some of these notes were thrown out onto the street to keep the fire from spreading. Many were scorched or burned. Passersby quickly took advantage of the situation, and spirited away. The collector’s price of this note is about 1 000 US$.

                 Notes above the $100 denomination ceased being printed in 1946 and were officially withdrawn from circulation in 1969. These notes were used primarily either in inter-bank transactions or by organized crime; it was the latter usage that prompted President Richard Nixon to issue an executive order in 1969 halting their use. With the advent of electronic banking, they became less necessary. Although they are still technically legal tender in the United States, the collector’s price of high-denomination bills is much higher than face value.

Small size dollars (6.125inches x 2.625 inches) (1929+)

Coins in circulation

DOLLAR

Obverse of 1921 Peace DollarReverse of 1921 Peace DollarObverse of 1884-O Morgan DollarReverse of 1884-O Morgan Dollar

$1 (1776-1996) - 200y. America

PEACE DOLLARS (1921-1964)

 

MORGAN SILVER DOLLARS (1878-1921)

silver 90%,38.5mm,26.5g

silver 90%,38.1mm,26.73g

HALF DOLLAR

There are silver and many types commemorative one dollar coins (1971+)

Franklin Half Dollar

Liberty Walking(1916-47)silver 90%,30.6mm,12.5g

silver 90%,30.6mm,12.5g

Franklin Half Dollars (1948-1963)

silver 90%,30.6mm,12.5g(1964only)

Kenedi Half Dollars(1964+)

center,30.6mm, 12.5g

outer layers 80% silver,20%copper

silver 90%,30.6mm,12.5g

30.60ìì;11.3g;75% Cu,25%Ni

(1971+)-Cu-Ni

silver and Cu-Ni

1976 (200 y. America)

(1982) George Washington

1986 Statue of Liberty(100 years)

(1965-70)(40% copper)

QUARTER

1917 "Type I" Standing Liberty Quarter Dollar Obverse1917 "Type I" Standing Liberty Quarter Dollar Reverse1932-D Washington Quarter Obverse1932-D Washington Quarter Reverse

24.3mm,6.3 g,90%silver,10% copper

STANDING LIBERTY QUARTER DOLLARS

24.3mm,6.3 g,90%silver,10% copper

90% SILVER PLANCHETS (1946-1964

WASHINGTON QUARTER DOLLARS

(1932+)

(1916-1930)

Center - 100% Copper,24.3mm,5.7g

Outer layers - 75% Copper, 25% Nickel

COPPER-NICKEL/COPPER CLAD PLANCHETS

(1965+)

silver and Cu-Ni

(1976)-200 y. America

DIME

 

17.9mm,2.5g,90%silver,10%copper

MERCURY HEAD DIMES

17.9mm,2.5g,90%silver,10%copper

ROOSVELT SILVER DIMES

Outer layers : 75% copper,25 % nickel

Center : 100% copper; 7.80mm,2.27g

 

ROOSVELT CUPRO-NICKEL  DIMES

(1965+)

(1946-1964)

(1916-1945)

NICKEL

Copper 75%,nickel 25%,21.2mm,5g

BUFFALO NICKEL FIVE CENTS

Copper 75%,nickel 25%,21.2mm,5g

BUFFALO NICKEL FIVE CENTS

1942-45(wartime)copp56%,silver35%,mangan9%)

Copper 75%,nickel 25%,21.2mm,5g

JEFFERSON HEAD FIVE CENTS

(1913)

(1913-1938)

(1938-42), (1946+)

CENT

Copper95%tin,zink5%,19mm,3.11g

 Lincoln Wheat Heads

(1909-1958)

Steel100%,19mm,2.7g

Lincoln steel

(1943)

Copper95%tin,zink5%,19mm,3.11g

Lincoln Memorial

(1959+)

United States Paper Currency

             1/ Fractional Currency (1862-76).

             Fractional Currency notes were issued from August 21, 1862 through February 15, 1876 due to a severe shortage of coins. Much of the public were using stamps as in lieu, but the post office did not like selling stamps for currency and they did not provide refunds for soiled stamps

             2/ Interest Bearing Notes(1861-64)

             Each note had a "maturity date," or the date that the owner could take it to the bank and collect the face value of the note plus some interest, so almost all Interest Bearing notes were returned to banks and taken out of circulation. There were none left to collect, so now they are very rare.

             3/ Compound Interest Treasury Notes(1864-65).

                 An exceedingly rare class of currency from a numismatic standpoint, were created in the middle of the Civil War, issued in denominations from $10 through $1,000. Each note had an expiration date, at which time the full amount would be paid by the Treasury. Meanwhile, notes increased in theoretical value as they were held and passed from hand to hand.

             4/ Refunding certificates(1879)

             Refunding certificates issued only in the $10 denomination, was a type of interest-bearing banknote issued by the United States Treasury.

             The Refunding Certificate originally promised to pay 4% annual interest in perpetuity till 1907 when fixed to $21.30.

             5/Treasury Coin Notes(1890-91)

Treasury Coin Note

             Treasury Notes were issued from 1890 to 1891.

             You could turn them in for gold or silver coins. They were also called Coin Notes.

             6/National Bank Notes(1863-1935).

                 Banknotes issued by banks chartered by the United States Government. The notes were backed by United States bonds the bank deposited with the United States Treasury. A small-size example of these notes was quite similar in overall appearance to most of the Federal Reserve Notes that circulated through the 1990s, except that it was stamped with the name of the issuing commercial bank, and bore the signatures of that bank's president and cashier.

             7/Gold Certificates(1863-1934)

                 Used from 1882 to 1933 in the United States as a form of paper currency. Each certificate gave its holder title to its corresponding amount of gold coin. Therefore, this type of paper currency was intended to represent actual gold coinage. In 1933 the practice of redeeming these notes for gold coins was ended by the U.S. government and until 1964 it was actually illegal to possess these notes (in 1964 these restrictions were lifted, primarily to allow collectors to own examples legally, however the issue technically converted to standard 'legal tender' with no connection to gold).

             8/United States Notes(1862-1966) (red number and seal)

                 The first permanent kind of federal paper money, the original "greenbacks." Previously, what the Treasury had issued in wartime were bonds and interest bearing notes. These were also issued during the Civil War, but then the innovation was introduced of Legal Tender Notes that paid no interest but were intended for "all debts public and private, except duties on imports and interest on the public debt.

             9/Silver Certificates(1878-1957)

Used for a time in the United States as a form of paper currency. The certificate was matched to the same amount of value in silver coinage. For example, one fifty dollar Silver Certificate = fifty silver dollars

                 A new kind of currency was created by the Federal Reserve Act of December 23, 1913. The Federal Reserve System was designed to be a decentralized organization of no less than twelve Federal Reserve Banks:  Boston (1-A), New York (2-B), Philadelphia (3-C), Cleveland (4-D), Richmond (5-E), Atlanta (6-F), Chicago (7-G), St. Louis (8-H), Minneapolis (9-I), Kansas City (10-J), Dallas (11-K), and San Francisco (12-L). The names of the banks and their characteristic number or letter have always appeared on Federal Reserve Notes and Federal Reserve Bank Notes issued by them. This assignment clearly reflects the distribution of population and economic development in 1914. It has not been modified since

Silver Certificates $1 & Federal Reserve Notes $2,5,10,20 brown seal and numbers issued for Hawaii in case of a Japanese invasion. HAWAII was printed vertically on the left and right side of the obverse and also horizontally .

             10/Federal Reserve Notes(1914+)

Silver Certificates yellow seal - Issued as payment for Allied troops in North Africa about to begin their assault into Europe.  Both of these types of notes could be declared worthless if they fell into enemy hands.

.

UNITED STATES

(dollar = 100 cents)

1-USD

Text Box: Import / Export restrictions:
	Foreign currency:
  In: free up to equivalent of 10 000 USD
  Out: free up to equivalent of 10 000 USD
	Local currency:
  In,:free up to 10 000 USD
 Out: free up to 10 000 USD
2000-S Sacagawea Dollar Obverse2000-S Sacagawea Dollar ReverseObverse of 1980-S Susan B. Anthony One DollarReverse of 1980-S Susan B. Anthony One DollarObverse of 1978-S One DollarReverse of 1978-S One Dollar

Sacagawea $1 (2000+) 8.1g,26.5/2 mm

Susan B. Anthony $1 (1978-99)

Eisenhower $1(1971-78) 22.7g,38.5 mm

2000-S Sacagawea Dollar Obverse

2007 presidential series

2000-S Sacagawea Dollar ObverseOval: to the rates
Related image

Last edition notes, the older ones are also still in circulation

· $1 Note (Face) - George Washington (1st U.S. President) (Back) - The Great Seal of the United States

· $2 Note (Face) - Thomas Jefferson (3rd U.S. President) (Back) - Signing of the Declaration of Independence

· $5 Note (Face) - Abraham Lincoln (16th U.S. President) (Back) - Lincoln Memorial

· $10 Note (Face) - Alexander Hamilton (1st Secretary of the Treasury) (Back) - U.S. Treasury Building

· $20 Note (Face) - Andrew Jackson (7th U.S. President) (Back) - White House

· $50 Note (Face) - Ulysses Grant (18th U.S. President) (Back) - U.S. Capitol

· $100 Note (Face) - Ben Franklin (Statesman) (Back) - Independence Hall

· $500 Note* (Face) - William McKinley (25th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 500 and the ornamental phrase "Five Hundred Dollars"

· $1000 Note* (Face) - Grover Cleveland (22nd & 24th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 1000 and the ornamental phrase "One Thousand Dollars"

· $5000 Note* (Face) - James Madison (4th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 5000 and the ornamental phrase "Five Thousand Dollars"

· $10,000 Note* (Face) - Salmon Chase (U.S. Treasury Secretary under Lincoln) (Back) - Numeral 10,000 and the ornamental phrase "Ten Thousand Dollars"

· $100,000 Note* (Face) - Woodrow Wilson (28th U.S. President) (Back) - Numeral 100,000 and the ornamental phrase "One Hundred Thousand Dollars". This note never appeared in general circulation, and was only used in transactions between Federal Reserve Banks.

United States Notes

$1

1928

 

 

 

$2

1928

1953

 1963

 

$5

1928

1953

1963

 

$100

 

 

 

1966

Silver Certificates

$1

$5

$10

1928

 

 

 

 

1933

1934

1934

1934

1935

 

 

 

1953

1953

1957

 

 

Federal Reserve Notes, until 1981

 $1

 

 

 

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

 $2

 

 

 

 

 

 

1976

 

 

 $5

1928

1934

1950

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

 $10

1928

1934

1950

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

 $20

1928

1934

1950

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

 $50

1928

1934

1950

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

 $100

1928

1934

1950

1963

1969

1974

 

1977

1981

$500,1000,5000,10000

1928

1934

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Area

(sq km)

Population (2005)

Language/Ethnicity

Ethnicity / Religion

Life duration

GDP per capita

(world position)

white 69.1%

9 629 091

298 444 215 (2006)

white (latino) 12.5%

Protestant 56%

male 73.37

2004 :39 496 (3)

Washington,DC

black 12.3%

Roman Catholic 28%

female 80.05

2005 : 41 800 (4)

570 898

asian 3,5%

Jewish 2%, other 4%